Howard Terpning

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The Art of Howard Terpning

Quite simply, Howard Terpning is one of the most lauded painters of Western art. His awards are so numerous and he is honored with them so often, that to list them would require changing the count every few months. To name three would be to cite the highest prizes awarded to Western art: countless awards from the Cowboy Artists of America, the Hubbard Art Award for Excellence, the National Acad ... Read More

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Cheyenne Red Shield

Among the Northern Cheyenne people, there was a society called The Red Shield Society, or the “Bull Soldiers.” This was the only soldier band so far as is known that carried a shield distinctive to the organization. The shields often had the buffalo tail hanging from the bottom. The members wore the skin of a buffalo bulls head with the horns attached. Once a man was elected to the society, he was a member for life.

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9 x 12 in
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A New Beginning
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33 x 28 in
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Medicine Man of the Cheyenne

To the Plains Indians the medicine man was a very important person. Not only did he practice practical medicine, he also relied on the natural super-stitions of the people to impress them with his abilities as a healer. Indeed, the medicine man often performed amazing feats of healing which would be completely unexplainable by today’s standards.

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39 x 47 in
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The Honor of Being Pipe Carrier

Winner of the Masters of the American WestThomas Moran Memorial Award for Artistic Merit (2016)

To carry a pipe among members of a war party was considered a great honor. These pipes were called black-covered war pipes or black-covered medicine pipes, and were carried by members of all Northern Plains tribes. The pipe itself was encased in a cover made from trade cloth or a trade blanket, and sometimes had an eagle feather attached at each end. This warrior has removed the pipe case from his shoulder and is telling his enemies that he is a formidable foe.

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31 x 39 in
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Spirit of the Plains

They followed the warrior’s way as proud horsemen with an appetite for competition, excellence and danger. Emboldened by bravery and with the protection of their sacred medicines, the Plains Indians would fight for revenge but welcomed the chance to test their courage.

Our ideal image of the Plains Indian warrior endures even though the full glory of his greatness has vanished. He remains an important American icon, every bit as pertinent to our past as the cracked bronze bell in Philadelphia or Plymouth Rock in New England. However, the “winning” of the American West is not a tale told of triumph, but rather of tragedy.

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21 x 27 in
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Transferring the Medicine Shield

The shield was considered a medicine object among the Blackfeet people and was treated with the same great care and reverence as other medicine bundles. If the shield were to be transferred to another, it had to be exchanged in a formal ritual.

As Terpning explains the ceremony, first a smudge would be made inside the tepee. The shield would be passed through the sacred smoke four times, four being considered a magical number by Plains Indians. The recipient of the shield was painted with yellow earth over the face and hands, the face would then be streaked by drawing the fingertips downward. A red transverse band was painted across the mouth. Four drums were beaten and special songs were sung. The seller then took up the shield and dodged about, pretending to avoid blows or arrow strikes, as in a fight. At the end of the ceremony, the recipient paid the former owner with a horse.

Howard Terpning’s Transferring the Medicine Shield was chosen to become an Anniversary Edition Fine Art Canvas because it is a masterpiece in the study of Native American rituals. It is a story of the harmony of the Plains People with their environment; of color and design; and of an artist with his subject. Be one of the few to own one of the finest works from one the greatest artists to ever paint the American West.

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30 x 45 in
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38 x 58 in
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Tribal Warfare

It is misleading to believe that inter-tribal warfare was a moderately dangerous game, a quest for individual status of counting coup and stealing horses. Wars between tribes competing over land and resources were happening long before the arrival of Europeans displaced Indian nations onto rival territories.

In this Plains Indian engagement, a Crow warrior with a gunstock war club engages a Sioux flag- carrying enemy. With its swinging force focused onto its small striking edges, the gunstock club could hit with remarkable power. The danger of the club was further increased by the addition of a short spear point or one or more blades positioned near the elbow of the weapon.

Like the Sold Out “War Chief,” “Change of Command” and “Apache Scout” is a SmallWorks™ whose impact extends far beyond its size.

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Image Size:
16 x 12 in
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Crows in the Yellowstone

Government propaganda helped spread the rumor that the hot springs and geysers of Yellowstone kept “superstitious” Indians, who were “afraid of evil spirits,” away from this mystical and fertile land. Declared a national park in 1872, Yellowstone was the scene of a set of hostile encounters between Chief Joseph’s fleeing Nez Perce and visiting tourists in 1877. The conflict created a public relations nightmare for the fledgling park service. The rumor, which persists today, was created and perpetuated in order to counteract the subsequent bad press and to draw tourists back to the park.

There is a world of difference between recognizing the sacred nature, mystery and power of a place and being afraid of it. The Crow respected and revered what they called “land of the burning ground” or “land of vapors.” Although they lived primarily in the region to the east of what became Yellowstone National Park, the Crow camped and hunted throughout the region.

The Crow were expert horsemen. They dubbed the horse “Ichilay,” meaning “to search with,” perhaps referring to the search for enemies and game. While other Plains tribes used the travois for hauling, the Crow, from children to elders, all rode and used packhorses that enabled them to travel fast no matter what the terrain. The Crow were regarded as premier horse thieves. One of the four military tests for an aspiring Crow warrior was to sneak into an enemy camp at night, capture a fine horse and bring it back successfully.

It was then almost impossible to catch the Crow, especially if they took refuge behind the Absaroka Range in what is now Yellowstone.

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25 x 35 in
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Color of Sun

The war paint on this young Native is the color of Sun, a sacred color with divine power. To the Plains warrior, such paint was far more than a means of appearing more ferocious before their enemies; it was also strong medicine used as a protective talisman in battle. The paint’s color and design was chosen to harmonize with each individual warrior’s own purpose, dreams and visions. He would not only paint his face, but his body and horse as well.

Yet, Terpning’s “Color of Sun” is not a story of war but of this Crow brave’s harmony with the land on which he lived. This field bathed with flowers was a place Terpning had once encountered and the vision of it lodged in him waiting for the proper time. Later, when he saw this man and horse it was natural to combine the two, particularly with the horse’s head tipped down toward the flowers.

“Once I had settled on the subject for this painting, it was a matter of balancing the human and animal figures and juxtaposing them with the yellow of the flowers and the somewhat interpretive greens and browns of the foreground and background,” explains Terpning.

Howard Terpning’s “Color of Sun” has been chosen to become an Anniversary Edition Fine Art Canvas because it is a masterpiece in the study of harmony. It is a story of the harmony of the Plains People with their environment; of color and design; and of an artist with his subject. Be one of the few to own one of the finest works from one the greatest artists to ever paint the American West.

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Image Size:
25 x 25 in
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Council Mediator

A tribal council was, and is, an association of Native American bands or the governing body for certain tribes and are generally formed along regional or ethnic lines. In council, decisions were reached by consensus, but youth acknowledged the wisdom and experience of their elders.

The ceremonial staff with feathers both signals this mediator’s role and imbues him with the necessary gravitas to shoulder the responsibilities of the task.

The mixed media original artwork is reproduced as a museum quality giclée on a 315g, 100% cotton rag paper with a velvet surface. “Council Mediator” is a unique piece for any Terpning collector, as well as a stand-alone, commanding centerpiece for a living room or office.

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Image Size:
23 x 38 in
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Do Not Disturb

Is this serious brave pondering past or future battles, planning a hunting strategy, or perhaps thinking about a young woman he is courting? Even if this young man is momentarily lost in a simple daydream, it does not appear to be the time to disturb him. Something is in the works, on the horizon, and his horse is alert.

Capturing the humanity of the Plains People–their strength, honor, beauty and freedom – and the harmony with the land that sustains their life, is Howard Terpning’s extraordinary talent. It would be impossible for him to portray such emotion and power so convincingly if he did not possess these same qualities himself.

Works of art such as Terpning’s Do Not Disturb allow us to reflect upon the values of a time gone by that we believe represent the best of who we are today. This Greenwich Workshop Limited Edition Canvas delivers that same quality art experience because it is itself a fine work of art. Created hand-in-hand with the artist, and then signed by Terpning himself, this edition of only 85 may not be as rare as the original but is a highly collectible work of art itself.

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Image Size:
23 x 31 in
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Coffee Coolers Meet The Hostiles

The “Coffee Coolers” or “Ration Indians” were Indians who had signed a peace treaty and consented to live on a reservation or near an agency. To the “Hostiles” these fellow tribesman had given up the warrior life in exchange for the white man’s handout. Sitting Bull expressed his contempt, “You are fools to make yourself slaves to a piece of fat bacon, some hardtack, and a little coffee and sugar.”

Yet, the animosity between the Hostiles and the Coffee Coolers was, in the end, misspent energy. Once the great westward expansion began in earnest, the Plains way of life, even for those who continued to hunt and fight, was doomed.

Howard Terpning’s “Coffee Coolers Meet the Hostiles” is a magnificent MuseumEdition™ Canvas large in size and extremely limited in number. In this grand fine art edition, the two factions come together on their ancestral land, one offering the peace pipe to other. On the horizon, a storm gathers strength. Perhaps this time, together, they can weather it.

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Image Size:
51 x 31 in
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War Chief

“Among the Plains warriors, the war chief became a leader because of his proven success in battle,” relates Howard Terpning. “If his war party’s returned to camp victorious, he would have an easier time recruiting warriors to participate in subsequent raids. These men were very brave and fierce which is the feeling that I tried to portray in this painting.”

Miniature art is an important part of any collection and a SmallWork™ is a simple way to either start or add to your collection. Such works are often a collector’s first purchase for the obvious reason, they are less expensive. As single works of art, they can be that final elegant touch in fine décor. At the other end of the spectrum, a wall of miniatures makes for an impressive display of a collector’s unique range of style and interest.

Each SmallWork is created with the same precision as all Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Editions, signed by the artist and numbered as a collectible limited edition.

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Image Size:
12 x 9 in
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Telling of the Legends

Since the Plains Indians had no written language, old chiefs and medicine men passed on their wisdom, the traditions of the People and a measure of their own medicine to younger men who would become heirs to tribal authority. These chosen individuals then kept the legends alive and passed them down to the next generation.

Howard Terpning saw this scene in the early morning as dawn broke over the northern Montana. The rising sun was in bright contrast to the dark blue shadows marking the distant mountains and deep canyons. At the time he was atop Chief Mountain with George Kicking Woman, a Medicine Man of the Peigan Nation:

“Influencing every part of their lives, the Blackfeet legends included tales of the tribes’ origin, their religion, heroic deeds of their people and the evil ways of their enemies. I’ve tried to capture the mood of a sacred time,” says Terpning, “where a young man learns of this past and his future responsibilities.”

“Telling of the Legends” is a remarkable 51″w x 31″h Anniversary Edition Museum Edition Canvas. The original work of this work was sold at the Coeur d’Alene Auction in 2013 for over $1.7 million.

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51 x 31 in
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Sign Along the Trail

The Native Americans had a multitude of ways to communicate with other members of their tribes. The Cherokee would bend a small sapling nearly to the ground, using the now-crooked tree to indicate a direction. Some of these crooked trees can still be seen today. Other trail-marking methods included piling stones or branches to create what are known today as cairns. If a trail was devoid of natural debris, a traveler might leave a personal item along the trail to attract attention and direct those who would follow. The horseman in this scene has found the marker left by his predecessor, confirming that he is on the right track.

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Image Size:
11 x 11 in
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Sunset for the Comanche

Artist Howard Terpning’s paintings of the American West have depicted some of the most dramatic and moving events in the history of the Plains People. In “Sunset for the Comanche,” Terpning’s brush recalls the valiant struggle by the Comanche people to retain their land, their freedom and their way of life.

“The Comanche people ruled the Southern Plains until the last quarter of the 19th Century,” relates the artist. Their warriors were said to be some of the best horsemen in the world and yet constant warfare and broken treaties drastically reduced their numbers. The Quohadi (the antelope clan) were the last of the people to surrender. To me, this scene represents the symbol of their strength as they clung to their old way of life as a warrior society. The sun is low on the horizon and the cottonwood trees cast long shadows that forebode the demise of their culture as they know it.”

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Image Size:
48 x 38 in
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The Lonely Sentinel

In the middle of winter, on the side of a snow-blanketed mountain, “The Lonely Sentinel” guards his post. Although he is beset on all sides by icy blasts and his horse shivers beneath him, the sentinel knows the value of honor and duty and will allow no wind to bow his head or bend his back.

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12 x 9 in
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The Long Trail Ahead

“Blackfoot warriors often traveled great distances on foot,” says Howard Terpning. “There are accounts of men walking as far south as Mexico (the ‘always-summer land’) to obtain horses. A lone warrior might decide to explore an unfamiliar part of the country; travel alone and on foot to seek out and avenge an enemy or to perhaps steal horses from that enemy. Whatever this man’s reason was for walking a great distance we can only speculate, but he had the survival skills and stamina to accomplish just about anything he set out to do . . . provided he avoided enemy war parties.”

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26 x 38 in
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Grandfather Prays to the Sun

“Many years ago, I camped overnight about a hundred feet from this spot,” says Howard Terpning. “As I recall, it is in an area of the Ruby Mountains in Montana, which was part of the vast region that was home to the Blackfoot people.

“Natosi (sun) was the dominant power in their lives and they believed that Sun gave life-giving energy to all things. I imagined that early one morning as Sun’s rays swept across the land, this old man dismounted from his pony. He held up his sacred eaglewing fan and his pipe and prayed to Sun as his two warrior grandsons looked on with deep respect for their grandfather and the traditions he embodied.

“The story in a painting like this is in the faces of the figures. I wanted to capture a reverence in the faces of these young men for their grandfather and the only way to achieve this is to make a large enough canvas so your figures can be large. With a large format you can introduce more drama, you can enter more into the play of light and shadow on the figures and you can achieve a more dramatic effect than you would on a smaller canvas.”

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Image Size:
48 x 33 in
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Proud Men

“They followed the warrior’s way,” writes Don Hedgpeth, author of “Spirit of the Plains People: The Art of Howard Terpning.” “They were proud prairie horsemen with an appetite for honor and the visceral thrill of danger. They looked death in the face and fought on, emboldened by bravery and the armor of their medicine. They rode for revenge but would fight too for no other reason than to plumb the depth of their courage. There was blood on the prairie where they passed by and women wailed in the lodges of their enemies.”

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Image Size:
12 x 11 in
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White Water Passage

“When the American West was truly wild country,” says artist Howard Terpning, “sometimes traveling on horseback was very difficult, if not impossible. Dense forests and fallen timbers often required riders to dismount and lead their horses through a passage that under normal conditions wouldn’t even be considered. In this case, these Crow warriors have found the forest so dense that passing through on horseback was out of the question, so their line of least resistance was forging ahead through icy cold water and slippery boulders.

“I enjoy painting water for a great many reasons, particularly white water. As an artistic device it creates drama and tension and draws the viewer’s eye through the scene. I wanted to express the motion of these travelers and the dangers they faced. Capable, resilient and experienced though these men might have been, the great force of the rushing waters posed quite a threat to them and their laden horses as they crossed.”

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Image Size:
34 x 40 in
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Light Cavalry

“The Apache were great horsemen,” says artist Howard Terpning. “All the Plains Indians were. This group of tribesmen travels between the mountains with only the clothes on their backs and a minimum of equipment — a far cry from the so-called ‘light cavalry’ of the American army.”

To understand the relationship between the Native American and the horse is no easy feat, but, true to form, Howard Terpning has delivered.

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Image Size:
13 x 8 in
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Found on the Field of Battle

“This is another tight grouping of three men similar to ‘The Long Shot,’ with approximately the same scale of the figures in relation to the surrounding area. This type of composition can tell a story very well and the viewer can see the story immediately. These three Cheyenne warriors have been in a battle with the cavalry and in the aftermath of the conflict they were able to find trophies on the ground that they prized highly. One man wears a cavalry hat, another has found a dispatch case which will no doubt be converted into something more to his liking and the third man has a bugle, which will give him bragging rights. Finding trophies on the field of battle is something that has gone on since battles were fought and this is my interpretation of such an experience.”

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38 x 30 in
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Horse of a Different Color

“I once read an account of a Cheyenne warrior who painted his body and his horse’s body entirely blue,” says Howard Terpning. “Just imagine the startling effect that must have had on his enemies as he charged them in battle. That description gave me the idea for the title (which seemed obvious). Adding the warrior’s son in the painting felt logical and gave the picture a higher level of human interest. To have listened in on the father and son conversation as this warrior prepared himself for battle would have been something.”

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20 x 13 in
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Deeds of His Father

In the 18th and 19th centuries, many Plains warriors told the stories of their war deeds and accounts of important events that took place each year in their lives, in simple form drawings that were not literal but rather highly stylistic — with many symbols that were understandable only to the Native Americans. These stories were drawn and painted on hides such as buffalo, elk, deer and antelope.

The warrior who produced the drawing on animal hides was telling friends and foe alike of his many accomplishments and deeds of bravery. This painting shows a young warrior proudly displaying his father’s painted robe on the back of his pony. He has placed his moccasins on the withers of his mount so they won’t get wet as he cools his feet in the water.

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12 x 9 in
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Trail Along the Backbone

The Blackfoot people referred to the Rocky Mountains as “the backbone of the world.” From the foothills of Rockies to the East extend the Great Plains. To the West, the Rockies ultimately drop off into the Pacific Ocean. Add in the amazing length of the Rockies from North to South and it is not hard to see that from the Blackfoots’ limited perspective at that time, they weren’t that far off the mark. There were trails that went across and over the Rockies at various places. In all probability they were originally game trails that were then used by man. This painting represents such a trail being used by three Blackfoot Warriors.

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44 x 36 in
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Seeking Wisdom Through the Pipe

To the Native Americans, growing tobacco was a sacred ritual. Smoking the pipe was a serious matter. It was not done casually. If a man or group of men took up the pipe, it was for the purpose of meditating and praying to resolve a problem that they might be confronted with. In other words, by smoking they hoped to gain wisdom. Incidentally, the tobacco tamper that the man is using is Sioux and dates from the mid-19th century. It is beautifully carved and wrapped with dyed porcupine quills.

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28 x 22 in
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Trail in the Bitter Roots

“This scene shows part of the old Lolo Trail used by the Nez Perce Indians when they left their home country in Idaho in 1877 and crossed over the Bitter Root range into the Bitter Root valley heading east in their attempt to reach Canada,” says artist Howard Terpning. “The trail was extremely rough and dangerous and yet hundreds of people managed to cross the mountains, including old people and children, with all their horses and goods. It was an amazing accomplishment. I could paint this portion of the trail with some authority since I spent two days riding the trail on horseback in the summer of 1985. It was this adventure that inspired me to do the painting.”

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Image Size:
46 x 38 in
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Legend of Geronimo

Collectors are surprised when they discover that Howard Terpning has depicted so few historically recognizable figures in his highly prized paintings of the Native American experience. “Legend of Geronimo” is only the second artwork that features such an identifiable tribal leader. “Chief Joseph Rides to Surrender,” released in 1982, was the other.

His life became an arc of fierce defiance against soldiers and the settlers who colonized Apache territory. It was the Mexicans who called him “Geronimo,” Spanish for “Jerome.” There were periods of relative peace for Geronimo, but those were brief. He resisted attempts to move Apaches to the barren San Carlos reservation and twice left with small bands, once for ten years during which he conducted raids against white settlements. He kept 5,000 soldiers plus hundreds of Indian scouts busy for five months chasing him across 1,645 miles until he surrendered in Sonora, Mexico.

Enroute to the United States, Geronimo escaped again. He surrendered months later with a promise of a return to Arizona after a brief imprisonment in Florida, a promise that was not kept. After years of hard labor in Florida he was moved to Fort Sill in Oklahoma Territory.

Geronimo lived long enough to appear as the legend himself at fairs and parades, selling souvenirs. He dictated his memoirs which were published in 1906. He died at age 80 in 1909.

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Image Size:
27 x 37 in
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Image Size:
18.5 x 24.75 in
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Paper That Talks Two Ways, The Treaty Signing

In the painting, we see a gathering of Cheyenne and Sioux men intently listening to a man who is an orator among his people. The words of the peace commission have been translated to him and he is expressing his distrust of those words. Terpning wanted the entire focus of the painting to be on the native people, so we see only the corner of a table and the shoes of the commissioner. The scene depicted here is not a specific treaty signing event, but it is loosely patterned after the Fort Laramie treaty of 1868. The title comes from the Indian expression that the treaty always said one thing to the white man and quite another to the native people.

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Image Size:
65 x 54 in
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Limited Edition Print
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Image Size:
40 x 33 in
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Where Spirits Dwell

To the Native American, a spiritual force was the source of all life and everything in nature had a soul, or a spirit, independent of its physical being. Their entire world was connected spiritually, with the physical and the mystical living side by side. This spirituality was the fundamental nature of the Plains Indian and the expanse of the West and the grandeur of its landscape only enforced this notion. “It is important to show the American Indian as he appears in his natural surroundings,” says Howard Terpning. “He lives with Mother Earth and his spirituality is bound to his environment. Many of my paintings are inspired by something in nature. What I look for in a landscape is how it can be dramatized to the best advantage in the painting.”

Many of Terpning’s most revered paintings focus on the wonder, admiration and respect the Native Americans held for the land in which they lived. “The Force of Nature Humbles All Men,” “With Mother Earth” and “On the Edge of the World” all explore the introspective power nature has over man. “Where Spirits Dwell” takes that idea one step further by presenting, in scale, the majestic scope of the land in relationship to man.

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Image Size:
25 x 35 in
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Hawk Feathers

Elevating the nobility of the human spirit defines the fine art of Howard Terpning. Through intuition and insight what begins as a simple portrait becomes a masterful representation of Native American dignity.

“Hawk Feathers” is not this Northern Plains Indian’s name, but rather, the adornment he wears in his hair. The hunting ability of the hawk was highly respected and its feathers were considered good medicine. Nearly every North American tribe used hawk feathers as a badge of honor and they were worn a good part of the time. This tribal member is also shown wearing his buffalo robe. Unlike Europeans, the plains people fashioned their robes with the fur on the inside and the smooth side of the hide facing out.

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Image Size:
9 x 9 in
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Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People

You know a painting is special when it’s the piece in an exhibition that the collectors just stand in front of for a long period of time and simply don’t say a word. And they keep coming back to do it again and again. If interrupted, they’ll return to it, intent on having the opportunity to enjoy a great work of art.

The winner of the 2011 Thomas Moran Award for Painting, “Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People” is a magnificent work. Terpning begins with a simple common premise; the grandeur of nature can be sacred. He relates that emotion not by creating a landscape painting, but by focusing on the reverence these men have for what they see. The petroglyphs show that this is an ancient understanding. These men knew it to be so in their time, just as we do today. Their silence, as they take in the wonder about them, is not unlike that of the collectors we saw view this work for the first time.

“Petroglyphs on rock formations indicate that the visitors are in a spiritual place,” describes Howard Terpning, “a place blessed by the long-ago people. Numerous locations like this exist throughout Montana and Wyoming, sometimes high on a mountain with a spectacular view of Mother Earth. For centuries, Indian people have made the journey to these sacred places to give thanks for their blessings and to pray for success in hunting and in battle. Today, they continue to visit these sacred places as their forebears did, leaving small pieces of trade cloth and handmade objects decorated with beads or feathers as gifts for the gods.”

“Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People” is available as a Fine Art Canvas. At 33” x 35” it is an impressive work that will majestically fill any large space. Our carefully crafted giclée canvas will give you the experience of owning this great work of art for significantly less than the price the original. Also available is a more moderately sized and wonderfully priced Fine Art Giclée Paper. Both editions, truly faithful reproductions of the original, are signed by Howard Terpning and numbered.

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 Giclée Canvas
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Image Size:
33 x 35 in
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Limited Edition Print
 Giclée Paper
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Image Size:
21 x 22 in
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Sharpshooters Closing on the Herd

“’Sharpshooters Closing on the Herd’ is, in a way, a play on words, since the warrior has a Sharps 50 caliber buffalo rifle in his hands,” says artist Howard Terpning. “This was a very powerful rifle and highly prized by the buffalo people. It’s getting late in the day and they may have been following this herd for many miles. If one buffalo sensed danger and started to run, the whole herd would run, so caution was very important. The Blackfoot hunters are downwind of the buffalo and are judging the distance from their prey in the hope that they can get off a shot before they are spotted. They have a good vantage point on this rock outcropping so there may be meat in camp tonight.”

With its stunning color palette and deceptively simple composition, this Terpning masterpiece tells a complete story of man, survival and the beauty of the physical world. These two hunters, with their expressions of patient determination, will finish the hunt and deliver food to those waiting back in camp.

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51 x 35 in
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Guarding the Lodge

“Let whoever may have attained so much as to have the power of drawing know that he holds a great treasure.” Michelangelo

There is a fundamental truth in art: learn to draw and the painting will follow. Drawing is the coordination of line, tone, perspective and proportion. It is the firm foundation on which a great painting rests. As a step in the creation of a painting itself, it is the part of the process by which the artist makes it clear to himself, not the spectator, what he is doing.

As finished art unto itself, Salvador Dali said, “Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.” With “Guarding the Lodge,” we see just how remarkable and powerful a drawing can be. The original is a mixed-media charcoal drawing on masonite. It was the 1998 Gold Medal Award Winner for Drawing and Other Media at the annual Cowboy Artist of America show. During that same event, Terpning collected the Gold Medal Award for Oil Painting for “Offerings to the Little People.” To top off the evening of achievement, Howard took home the Artist Choice Award for Best in Show as well.

“This Blackfoot warrior is placing his sacred medicine bundles on a tripod outside of his tipi. These sacred bundles were always hung behind the tipi,” describes Terpning. “In working on this composition, I felt that the tripod itself was such a strong design element that I wanted to make sure that it was prominent in the overall layout of the picture. The important thing was to make sure that the figure was clearly visible and that the viewer could see that he was attaching the bundle as he held the other items in his left arm.”

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22 x 41 in
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The Captain’s Horse

The Apache, like most Plains Indian tribes, made horse stealing into a high art. Horses were captured from other tribes and from the white men and their soldiers. The introduction of the horse forever transformed everything about a Native culture that previously lived only on foot; how they hunted, traveled and even competed for honors within their tribes. “A captured cavalry horse that had been ridden by a captain is a bigger prize than one that belonged to an enlisted man,” Howard Terpning says. “The theft or capture of this horse will bring more bragging rights.”

This lone Apache, armed and confident, may be cooling off his horse, or hiding his tracks, as he cuts through the hot, dry territory in the Southwest. “We can only imagine how this Apache warrior was able to obtain this mount,” muses Terpning. “The title, ‘The Captain’s Horse,’ hints at enough of a story to trigger our imagination and let the viewer draw their own conclusions.”

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16 x 13 in
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Far Seeing Glass

Who, or what, does this Blackfoot warrior search for in the valley below? Has news of an enemy’s war party reached camp? Are they war party scouts them-selves? Is the cavalry on the move? Perhaps, he spies buffalo or game?

This rock formation is west of the Madison range in Montana, not all that distant from Yellowstone National Park. The Blackfoot people would often travel through this area and camp at various sites. A vantage point such as this, offering both concealment and scope of vision, would be the location of choice for any scout in the area. The monocular scope the warrior is using was a much sought after tool that was highly prized for obvious reasons. The Native Americans were quick to adopt whatever white man goods that they found useful.

Howard Terpning has staged “Far Seeing Glass” to leave little doubt in our minds that something has caught the eye of these two braves. He has been just as careful not to answer what that is. As a master craftsman, Howard invites us into the painting through the beauty of his design and execution. As a master storyteller, he gives us ownership of the work by having us complete the story and determine just what it is they see.

“Far Seeing Glass” is a prime example as to why Howard Terpning is held in such high regard by critics, collectors and fellow artists alike. This oversized, MasterWork Canvas will be made available in a Fine Art Edition of only 75 pieces, each is signed by Howard. When you purchase a Greenwich Workshop Limited Edition Fine Art Canvas, you possess the best of the best.

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39 x 29 in
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Winter Coat

The winter wind in the north country blows cold and hard and can bite through to the bone. To survive, man and beast must wear warm coats. In this painting, the Crow Indian has a buffalo robe across his lap and a thick buckskin shirt to protect him from the cold and snow. His pony, with hind quarters facing into the wind’s teeth, wears his own thick, shaggy winter coat.

Animal skins were essential to the Indian’s dress, rituals and shelter. In addition to his shirt and robe, this Indian is carrying a society staff wrapped with otter fur. He has a small medicine pouch tied to his belt and a stuffed ermine skin attached to his shoulders. Thus, the pelts, or “coats” of many animals serve two masters.

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11.5 x 9 in
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Shepherd of the Plains

The importance of the horse to the Plains Indians cannot be overestimated. An Indian’s horses were a tangible sign of wealth. The women of a Plains family would each need several pack horses, while the men could claim double that number of hunt and war horses. Children had their own ponies. The Indian’s horses tended to be small; there are old photographs in which the toes of mounted Indians nearly touched the ground. But what Indian ponies lacked in size, they made up for in numbers, for histories speak of herds numbering in the thousands. They had stamina and speed when the need arose, earning the name ‘spirit of the air faster than wind.’

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9.5 x 9 in
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Leader of Men

This is a Crow Indian of the pre-Reservation period, about 1850 to 1860. This shows the character in the man with a lot of focus on his eyes. Actually, chiefs gained prestige within their band or tribe if they did not flaunt wealth. They would be more inclined to give things away and be more austere in appearance than their comrades. This was a sign of their leadership.

Here he has a bow case which is quite a good one. It is made out of mountain lion skin and has bead work on it. The strong pattern with the shape of the bow case comes up diagonally, leading up to the face and the old Crow war bonnet with the eagle feathers then back down the right side.

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18 x 26 in
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Broken Trail

“These two Northern Plains warriors are following a trail that was probably a game trail originally,” Terpning relates about the painting. “Since they are using a pack horse, they are no doubt traveling a considerable distance. Snow melt or heavy rains could sometimes produce such a volume of water that it wiped away everything in its path. This landscape has been changed by the destructive forces of the water and what used to be a natural bridge of sorts has been completely washed away, so that these men must seek another route to reach their destination.”

This painting, and over 80 others was on display in Howard Terpning: Tribute to the Plains People, a retrospective museum show in 2012 at the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, CA.

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34 x 23 in
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Traders Among the Crow

This fine art limited edition print is paired with the book Tribute to the Plains People


The period in this scene is 1848–1850. These free traders have left the large fur companies and are working on their own. They have entered the edge of a Crow camp with many trade goods to entice the inhabitants to exchange buffalo robes for gun powder, lead, knives, axes, blankets, tobacco and the various other items displayed on the ground. They use a wagon to carry their goods, and perhaps for transportation because the man with the glengarry hat and a cane has an injured leg. (Wagons were used on the Santa Fe Trail as early as 1821 so by the late 1840s they could be found in many out of the way places throughout the Plains.) Howard made the group small to give the scene a sense of intimacy. Of course, there is no telling how many people are surrounding the group pictured.

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Image Size:
36 x 50 in
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Whiskey Smugglers

A band of Sioux warriors has come upon a wagon loaded down with contraband in Howard Terpning’s award-winning “Whiskey Smugglers.” The strangers talk and smile with their mouths but their eyes and their hearts are hard. The white man’s whiskey was a curse upon the People. It induced an initial euphoric state like that experienced during a sacred vision quest. But there were no spiritual revelations . . . nothing at all but drunkenness and despair. The white man’s empty promises and treaties could rob the People of their land. His whiskey could steal their souls.

“Whiskey Smugglers” won the Gold for Gouache at the 1998 Cowboy Artists of America show. It was one of five awards Howard took home that evening including two other Gold awards, the CA Award and to top it off, Best of Show. “Guarding the Lodge,” which was released last August and is Sold Out at Publisher, won one of those Gold awards.

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Image Size:
36 x 24 in
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Bear Tracks

If you had any doubt about the story in this painting, the firearms and weapons that these Native American hunters carry are ample evidence of their intent. Great Plains grizzly bears have been extinct for over 100 years but when this species was abundant, a bear kill was a mark of great bravery and a grizzly claw necklace was a coveted trophy and prized possession. Even with the rifle, taking a grizzly down was no easy hunt since the bear could take a bullet or two and still keep coming. There are scores of Native American legends about bear and the bear track symbol on clothing and other artifacts, considered a good omen.

Terpning made sure that the bear track was accurate through his characteristic research, which in this case meant a visit with the finished painting to his close friend Bob Kuhn (who said the painting of the bear track was exactly right). The focal point of the image is the light area with the bear track. From there the eye moves up to the pinto’s white and dark markings. The riders on the light field with the shadowed pines make a study unto themselves. The large tree fallen in the foreground reinforces the angle of the bow cases and bows making for an elegant vertical composition.

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21 x 25 in
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The Family Home

The painted area around the bottom of the tipi cover is referred to as the Bottom Skirt and therefore symbolized Father Sky. All human events were contained between these two boundaries-Mother Earth below and Father Earth Above.

Owners of a painted tipi treasured it more as a religious symbol than as an aesthetic creation. Each design protected the family inside and was intended to help them live happy, successful and safe lives.

“Family Home,” a new artwork by Howard Terpning, lets us know that we are in a Blackfoot camp from the designs on the lodges. Mountain peaks decorate the base of the central tipi, the first of three bands usually found on a painted tipi. Bottom skirt designs used patterns that symbolized Earth’s surface. This paid spiritual tribute to the importance of Mother Earth. Designs at the tops of painted tipis represented the upper limit of the physical world, here a blue stripe for the sky and a red strip for life. The middle band could one day contain pictographs of war exploits or symbols that the family found important or lucky.

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13 x 8 in
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Crow Country

“Crow Country” was a land truly blessed by Akba’tat-di’a (the Maker of Everything). At the height of Crow power, their territory consisted of some of the most stunning landscapes in all of North America. Extending from the Black Hills of North Dakota across Montana to the headwaters of the Yellowstone River in Wyoming, Crow country was a dynamic combination of buffalo-laden plains, thriving forests, mountain peaks and fertile valleys.

“My goal for this painting was to show a tranquil camp scene in a beautiful setting as a backdrop for a war party leaving to raid an enemy camp and perhaps steal some horses if the opportunity presented itself,” says Howard Terpning. “Normally, warriors heading for enemy camps to steal ponies would travel on foot and then ride the captured ponies back to their own camp, but they usually did what the leader of the war party wanted to do.”

Crow Country was one of the two stars of the recent Heritage Western & California Art Signature Auction in Dallas, TX. The only work commanding a higher price was Terpning’s own “Plunder from Sonora.” As stated by Ed Beardsley, Vice President of Fine & Decorative Arts at Heritage, “Not only did we offer some of the most recognizable names in Western art, it was arguably some of their finest work and observant buyers recognized that. It was a standing room only crowd of lovers of great Western and California art at Heritage’s world headquarters.” The auction included works of Bierstadt, Russell, Leigh and Fechin.

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Image Size:
43 x 28 in
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Mystic Power of the War Shield

Because warriors depended upon the shield to protect them in battle, they went to great lengths not only to construct it as strongly as possible but also to have protective spiritual powers imparted to it. Here, Cheyenne gallop at full speed, shaking their war shields at the sun, then leaning down to brush them against the grass, invoking medicine believed to turn away enemy bullets and arrows.

A warrior might spend months making a shield, working and reworking until he was satisfied that it was done just right. Often he decorated it with symbols of his own personal medicine, given him by a spirit guide. He was likely to ring it with feathers and charms. When he galloped forward in a charge, the feathers on his shield, as well as any tied in his hair or his pony’s mane and tail, would stream in the wind and make him appear even fiercer than he might have been. He had a fine sense of pageantry and of the psychological effect it might have upon the enemy who faced the charge.

The shield was jealously guarded against anything that might diminish its spiritual power. Its loss to an enemy was regarded as particularly dangerous because the enemy might use its magic against its owner and those around him.

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Mystery of the Underwater People

These mystical inhabitants of rivers and lakes may not only be a source of sacred power to the Blackfoot, but quite possibly to Howard Terpning as well. “The Force of Nature Humbles All Men,” “Moving Day on the Flathead” and now “Mystery of the Underwater People,” some of Terpning’s most highly regarded, sought-after and honored works, derive their inspiration from the relationship between water and people.

At the 2013 Masters of the American West Exhibition and Sale, “Mystery of the Underwater People” received the Thomas Moran Memorial Award, given in recognition of exceptional artistic merit. This is the ninth time a Terpning painting has won this award.

The Underwater People, or “Suyitapis,” may dwell in the rivers and lakes, but their influence on land is significant. Many Blackfoot medicine bundles, painted lodge covers and other sacred items derive their power from them. As Howard relates: “In the early days, when the Blackfoot people lived on the land where their ancestors were buried, they believed that other animals and people lived under the water. Some believed that these animals looked similar to the ones roaming their country but were different in some way and they believed that the underwater people also differed from them. In this scene, a man who could be an uncle or perhaps a medicine man is explaining to these young boys the dangers and mysteries that lie beneath the water. This was part of their education and introduction to the adult world.”

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43 x 33 in
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Change of Command

Following the Civil War, the Sioux, along with their Cheyenne and Arapaho allies, struck at will against civilian and military targets all along the trails that led in and out of Fort Laramie. In 1865, the Powder River Expedition was sent to quell the violence but was routed in several engagements by superior forces that numbered as high as two thousand warriors.

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8 x 13 in
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Major North and the Pawnee Battalion

“Major North and the Pawnee Battalion” is a brilliant, over-sized MasterWork Giclee Canvas that represents Howard Terpning at his finest. Composition and design are the special effects of painting and in Terpning’s hands they transform a casual moment of camp life into an epic work of art.

Following the Civil War, U.S. troops were dispatched to the northern Great Plains to quell Indian uprisings. Major Frank North enlisted one hundred Pawnee scouts to assist in the early campaigns against their old enemy, the Sioux. They were able allies. Later, as the Union Pacific Railroad built out onto the plains, a contingent of two hundred Pawnee was sent to provide security for the construction crews and was formally designated as North’s Pawnee Battalion.

From the inspiration of an intriguing story, the Terpning goes on to work his magic. Beginning at the wagon wheel at left, the eye travels without rest through a vast range of unique moments in this painting: officers studying a map before a line of tents, their compatriots and horses, the atmospheric smoke, a central rider looking down, the Pawnee crouched, the individual with the high-hat and deftly angled rifle, to the flat behind with many Pawnee waiting in the distance. Then the eye rests a moment in the foreground then begins its journey all over again. The individuals are distinct, yet linked, like any command.

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50 x 31 in
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The Rivers’ Gift

Opportunity and misfortune often traveled hand in hand in the Old West as Howard Terpning’s The River’s Gift so dramatically displays. Where are the pioneers who came west with this wagon? What were their dreams and desires? Did they reach the end of their trail forsaken and forlorn, like the shattered wood of the wagon?

Yet for these two Cheyenne, their find represents good fortune. They will strip the iron rims to make spear points and arrowheads. The spokes and the other wood will also prove to be useful. Perhaps, along the river’s bottom and edge, more bounty can be found.

The River’s Gift is not only masterful storytelling, it is masterfully designed and rendered as well. The massive wall of rock behind the Cheyenne keeps the eye from drifting off into the distance. The angle of the riders and the gap in the wall serve to drive your attention down to the river. Each rock is strategically placed to draw your eye to the broken wagon, which in turn directs you once again to the Cheyenne.

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Image Size:
39 x 23 in
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Apache Scout

“It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand.” -Apache saying

Two hundred Apache scouts served with the army in its final campaign against Geronimo in 1885 and 1886 and were largely responsible for its success. So why would Apaches become scouts for the army to track down fellow tribesmen?

First, it has to be understood that disunity and blood feuds that separated the different Apache groups played a large part in recruiting Apaches as scouts. And certainly the regular pay was an incentive. But to an Apache, being well-armed and doing a warrior’s work – using their tracking and fighting skills that they learned and knew since childhood – was a better way than the cramped confinement of reservation life.

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10 x 15 in
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Patient Provider

“Patient Provider” reflects the values, purpose and determination of the Edition’s owner as much as it does the proud people it depicts. The roles of father, son, husband, brother, friend, protector and provider are not always comfortable and easy, yet they define our highest purposes and the greatest accomplishments.

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26 x 19 in
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The Trackers

“Over the years, I have seen many come and visit, yet most miss the obvious opportunities to truly see and hear the unique qualities of our tribal homeland,” relates Blackfoot Daryl Kipp in his introduction of Howard Terpning “A Tribute to the Plains People.” “Howard’s paintings serve an important role for their profound portrayal of Indian people, which help capture the ever-fading image of early-day Native America.”

Terpning’s description of “The Trackers” is such an observation, “Scenes such as this played out countless times in the 18th and 19th centuries. We don’t know who they are tracking, but they do not seem to sense immediate danger because they don’t have their bows in hand. They see signs among the rocks, such as a broken twig or displaced moss. We do know that they won’t give up their search ¨D whether they find the enemy they are seeking, we will never know.”

It is the power of Terpning’s artistic skill that enables these observations to be all the more profound. The Trackers is just the type of work to which Kipp refers. Two men inhabit a beautiful, pristine landscape. Howard conveys subtly, but implicitly, these men’s tie to it. For generations this has been their land and any disturbance to it will be noted and pursued.

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32 x 30 in
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Caution Born of Necessity

Plains Indian life was not the idyllic at-peace-with-the-world existence some romanticists would like us to believe. The Indian lived with constant exposure to the elements, to hunger and privation and the less-than-tender mercies of enemy neighbors. Like the wild animals among whom he lived and from whom he took careful lessons in survival, he developed a strong sense of watchfulness, of caution.

As a storyteller, Terpning is able to use the simple task of getting water as a vivid example of the tenuous nature of Plains Indian life. As an artist, the water provides Terpning with the ability to create a great abstract form that leaps out from this work, driven by the cool reflections of the river and the man leaning hesitantly forward. His reflection in the water and that of his horse, form a part of that dynamic shape. The slight touches of light upon the horse make this vivid work complete.

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Image Size:
14 x 23 in
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The Second Geronimo Campaign

On September 5, 1886, Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles sent a telegram to his superiors in Washington, D.C. announcing that the 16-month war with Geronimo was finally over. This marked the end of 25-years of intermittent warfare between the Chiricahua Apaches and the United States. Without Apache scouts (which included Western Apaches), chances are the military would not have accomplished this.

Geronimo’s final campaign began on May 17, 1885, with 143 followers, 41 of whom were fighting men. War weary or unhappy with Geronimo, the balance of the tribe, some 385 individuals, had stayed on the reservation. Hoping to put a quick end to the war, many of the remaining Chiricahua men actually enlisted as scouts. They were led by Chatto, a 40-year-old chief. Pursuing Geronimo was a dangerous task he recalled, “I carried a double cartridge belt with 45 to 50 cartridges on each belt. My rifle was loaded and my finger on the trigger following fresh tracks of hostiles, not knowing when a bullet might go through my forehead.”

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Image Size:
40 x 21 in
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Hope Springs Eternal – The Ghost Dance

When Howard Terpning’s Hope Springs Eternal—The Ghost Dance was unveiled at the 1987 Cowboy Artists of American show, it was instantly recognized as a modern masterpiece. The scale of the 60” x 44” original provided the perfect platform to showcase the artist’s prowess with light, composition, balance and structure. At such a large size, the emotion and humanity spills out from his painting. It won both Cowboy Artists of America Oil Painting Gold Award and the Western Art Associates Best of Show Award.

The 1876 defeat of Custer’s 7th Cavalry at Little Big Horn proved to be a Pyrrhic one for the Sioux and the Cheyenne as well as the Plains Indian culture. From that point on, it became a priority for the U.S. government to establish unquestioned control of the West.

The entire Plains Indian way of life came under attack with the intent to destroy it. Bison were no longer hunted for their hides, they were simply slaughtered. By 1881, most tribes had been hunted, harried and driven onto the harsh, unproductive lands sets aside as reservations. Confined, malnourished and stripped of their freedom and dignity, the suffocation of the Plains Indians and their culture was underway.

In 1889, a Paiute medicine man, while suffering a high fever, had a vision. In it, he journeyed to the afterworld and saw that those who had died in the past were living a happy life. He was told that through dance his people could regain the old ways that had been taken from them. The dance would resurrect the dead, bring back the buffalo and cause the white man to disappear. That his vision occurred during a solar eclipse only added to its significance.

The Ghost Dance swept the Plains like a wildfire and was embraced like a religion. The promise of a return to the life they had lost was a powerful intoxicant. As tribe after tribe entered the movement ― the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Shoshone, Comanche and Sioux ― the U.S. government became more and more concerned.

The dancers wore loose shirts and dresses that were adorned with feathers, fringe and symbols of the moon and stars. They moved in a counter-clockwise direction to the rhythm of drums, chants and songs. Handfuls of dirt were hefted into the air to symbolize the burial of the white man. As they danced some would fall into trances where they claimed to communicate with the dead. It was believed that the Ghost Shirts and Dresses they wore would be impervious to the soldiers’ bullets.

The Ghost Dance soon emboldened bands of Indians to leave their reservations and return to their old way of life. That was the beginning of the final end. The army hunted down those that left the reservations; leaders such as Sitting Bull were killed and finally, the violence culminated on December 29, 1890 with the massacre at Wounded Knee.

This work of raw spiritual emotion is one of Terpning’s most powerful tributes to the Plains Indian way of life. It is simply one of the finest works of art you could ever hope to possess.

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Image Size:
56 x 39 in
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They Came From Nowhere

During the early part of the 19th century, the Blackfoot Nation was the dominant tribe of the North Central Plains. Their territory included some of America’s best beaver trapping streams. Trappers discovered by Blackfoot warriors were often killed (and often with guns obtained through beaver and buffalo hide trade with competing French fur traders). This lone trapper will need to draw on all his skills and luck if he is to survive being caught out in the open by this stealthy war party.

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Image Size:
37 x 22 in
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Cheyenne at the Disappearing Creek Called “White Woman”

“In the 19th century and before, in what is now western Kansas, there was an area called the ‘White Woman Basin,’” says artist and storyteller Howard Terpning. “It is more or less centered between the north and south borders of the state. In the early days there was a creek which meandered into the basin and at some point disappeared into the ground. This creek is still on the map. The basin had many pools and springs and was an important source of water for the Southern Cheyenne who ranged over Kansas and the surrounding country. Small parties of Cheyenne warriors would often stop with their horses for a welcome drink.”

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Image Size:
28 x 35 in
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Medicine Horse Mask

From Howard Terpning, one of the most important artists in America, comes this stunning canvas featuring three Crow warriors preparing for an adventure. The head masks (or face masks) worn by horses were usually made for leading warriors and were considered medicine objects that gave power, protection and strength to the horse and its rider. The masks often had beautiful quill work, beads and feathered adornment and their design was sometimes inspired by a vision. Central to Native American medicine is the belief that each human and every object has a corresponding presence in the spirit world. These spirits can promote health, wisdom and even success in battle.

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Image Size:
26 x 30 in
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Camp at the Cougar’s Den

“Some years ago, while riding horseback in the Bitterroot Range with a friend, we came upon this interesting maze of rocks and fallen timbers high up in the mountains,” says Terpning regarding the inspiration for “Camp at Cougar’s Den.” “Upon close examination we could detect the smell of a cougar in the small cave-like enclosure. The whole scene took on an even more primitive and wild nature and I knew that this den could be the setting for a story. I realized a camp scene would be a logical choice, with Blackfoot raiders out to create some mischief and stopped for the night before traveling on.”

Howard Terpning’s devotion and respect for his subject matter, extraordinary palette, brushstroke and the ability to evoke emotion have made him the most lauded painter of Western art. “Camp at Cougar’s Den” was recipient of a pair of awards at the Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition and Sale at the Museum of the American West: The Thomas Moran Memorial Award for Painting for Exceptional Artistic Merit and The Patron’s Award for Work Most Popular with the Patrons of the Exhibition and Sale.

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Image Size:
45 x 36 in
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Chased by the Devil

Three Apaches race to stay ahead of a dust devil, the desert hot-weather whirlwind full of dust and debris. These ethereal pillars of air and dirt have meandered the baked earth since the oceans first receeded. The white man speaks of thermals and explains them in dry meteorological terms, but the Apache knew better. He knew that the devil was inside the whirlwind and that if you were caught you would soon die. Howard Terpning created a strong feeling of motion to convey the sense of the Apaches galloping their horses as hard as they could, emphasized by this awe-inspiring composition.

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Image Size:
30 x 37 in
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Solitude

Yellows and whites blend with earth tones to set the tranquil tone. The sun’s light bathes the landscape and accents its loveliness. A Northern Plains Indian sits quietly on his pony. A second horse on a lead drinks calmly from the stream in which they stand. Even the stream is at peace. Terpning has captured a moment of stillness, perhaps a moment for pondering life’s meaning. What is this warrior thinking? Will this be one of only a few quiet moments in his day? “I wanted to capture how much the Native people enjoyed the beauty and serenity of the land,” says Terpning. He has done just that.

Limited Edition Print
Giclée Canvas
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
15 x 10 in
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The Shaman and His Magic Feathers

The title of shaman was given to a person within a tribe who had powers beyond the limits of human understanding. The shamans were remarkable not only for their extraordinary powers, but for their ability to control them. The Native people of the American plains accepted these powers as proof of supernatural blessing, both of the shaman and of their tribes.

It was not uncommon for a shaman to give a public demonstration to inspire wonder and awe in his audience. In “The Shaman and His Magic Feathers,” a shaman has invited a small group of his tribesmen to witness his magical abilities. Away from the camp, the shaman has built a small fire and blessed it with sage and juniper. Before the approaching storm arrives, he will use his powers to float the feathers in the air above the flames, where they will hang for as long as he wishes.

Limited Edition Print
 Giclée Canvas
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
60 x 45 in
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Limited Edition Print
 Giclée Canvas
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
45 x 34 in
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New Doll for My Granddaughter

Inspired by the artist’s love of his own granddaughters, this elegant portrait of a devoted grandmother is distinctive within Terpning’s work because of its focus on the feminine nature of tribal life.

Limited Edition Print
Giclée Canvas
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
31 x 33 in
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Calling the Buffalo

The indomitable power of the human spirit binds mankind. We can recognize and identify with this across nationality, geography and time. Howard Terpning’s ability to capture and express this in his art is what attracts us to his paintings and sets them apart from others. We share his awe for the beauty of our world in “The Force of Nature Humbles All Men,” the burden of leadership in “Chief Joseph Rides to Surrender” and the expression of this Blackfoot medicine man’s belief and faith in Terpning’s newest release, “Calling The Buffalo.”

Limited Edition Print
 Giclée Canvas
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
25 x 32 in
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Limited Edition Print
 Giclée Paper
Handsigned by the artist
Image Size:
18 x 23 in
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